Have no anxiety at all, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, make your requests known to God. Then the peace of God that surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.
Phil 4:6-7



Monday, February 11, 2013

In lieu of blogging...


...today I'll be praying for our Pope.

Because I am so very sad. I really, really love our beloved Papa.

12 comments:

  1. As soon as I'm done with my work on the computer, I'll be doing the same!

    A prayer for Pope Benedict XVI:

    O God, who in your providential design willed that your Church be built upon blessed Peter, whom you set over the other Apostles, look with favor, we pray, on Benedict our Pope and grant that he, whom you have made Peter’s successor, may be for your people a visible source and foundation of unity in faith and of communion. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. - Missale Romanum

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  2. Oh, my heart!!!

    Praying with you, friend.

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  3. I'm with you. I really really love him too.

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  4. Joining you in prayer for a very dear man and Papa.

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  5. My favorite Pope of all my life was Blessed John Paul II. One of his greatest gifts to us, one that impressed so many people, was the courageous manner in which he faced old age, infirmity and the certainty of death. These were gifts he gave to the world for all to see. There is no shame in aging, nor fatigue or physical weakness. Jesus said, "Thou art Peter and upon this rock I will build my Church." I hope that Benedict pondered Jesus' words and John Paul's example before making this decision.

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  6. I know that this had to be an extremely difficult decision for the Pope. My feeling is that he did not want to leave the Church "unshepherded" in any way due to his own physical decline. It was heartbreaking to watch Pope John Paul II as his illness swallowed him up. This will give Pope Benedict the opportunity (if asked) to serve as a mentor to his successor, and it gives a wonderful example to the world of how to bear with great dignity and even generosity the indignities that come with the aging process.
    I am saddened that it had to happen, but I believe that Pope Benedict made his decision with the good of the Church foremost in his heart.

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  7. Linda,
    Blessed John Paul II was a great example of dedication. Just because Pope Benedict XVI does not feel he should follow the same path does not mean he is not dedicated. Did you read his letter? From the letter: "I am well aware that this ministry, due to its essential spiritual nature, must be carried out not only with words and deeds, but no less with prayer and suffering. However, in today’s world, subject to so many rapid changes and shaken by questions of deep relevance for the life of faith, in order to govern the barque of Saint Peter and proclaim the Gospel, both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months, has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me."
    I trust him implicitly to know that the Church needs an able-bodied and fully engaged man to keep up with all of the issues needing its attention. I am sad that the man it needs is not him, but I give him great credit for being able to see that the Church can not move forward as it needs to with him as Peter's successor. I love him and will miss seeing his beautiful face.

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  8. Thank you to the 2 Barbaras for your insights and thoughtful words. I will pray about this during the next weeks when a monumental change to the Papacy will be decided in Rome.

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  9. People forget that the demands of the papacy do and have changed over the years. Just one example...Popes several hundred years ago weren't expected to travel like modern Popes are. And even though John Paul II was a wonderful example of suffering and respectful aging, then Cardinal Ratzinger, would have been more aware of any advantage that was taken of his frailty by less than scrupulous people. I told a friend the other day, perhaps, by stepping down, it's his way of saying "not on my watch".

    I sent you an email, but just to let you know here... Baby Anna is home with her sweet mama!

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I appreciate your comments -- sometimes I feel like I'm talking to myself!